Loading...

jueves, 27 de octubre de 2011

Up the Career Ladder, Lipstick In Hand


In a study, women were photographed wearing varying amounts of makeup, from left:   barefaced, natural, professional and glamorous. Viewers considered the women wearing more makeup to be more competent. 

WANT more respect, trust and affection from your co-workers? 
  Wearing makeup — but not gobs of Gaga-conspicuous makeup — apparently can help. It increases people’s perceptions of a woman’s likability, her competence and (provided she does not overdo it) her trustworthiness, according to a new study, which also confirmed what is obvious: that cosmetics boost a woman’s attractiveness.
It has long been known that symmetrical faces are considered more comely, and that people assume that handsome folks are intelligent and good. There is also some evidence that women feel more confident when wearing makeup, a kind of placebo effect, said Nancy Etcoff, the study’s lead author and an assistant clinical professor of psychology at Harvard University (yes, scholars there study eyeshadow as well as stem cells). But no research, till now, has given makeup credit for people inferring that a woman was capable, reliable and amiable.
The study was paid for by Procter & Gamble, which sells CoverGirl and Dolce & Gabbana makeup, but researchers like Professor Etcoff and others from Boston University and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute were responsible for its design and execution.
The study’s 25 female subjects, aged 20 to 50 and white, African-American and Hispanic, were photographed barefaced and in three looks that researchers called natural, professional and glamorous. They were not allowed to look in a mirror, lest their feelings about the way they looked affect observers’ impressions.
One hundred forty-nine adults (including 61 men) judged the pictures for 250 milliseconds each, enough time to make a snap judgment. Then 119 different adults (including 30 men) were given unlimited time to look at the same faces.
The participants judged women made up in varying intensities of luminance contrast (fancy words for how much eyes and lips stand out compared with skin) as more competent than barefaced women, whether they had a quick glance or a longer inspection.
“I’m a little surprised that the relationship held for even the glamour look,” said Richard Russell, an assistant professor of psychology at Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, Pa. “If I call to mind a heavily competent woman like, say, Hillary Clinton, I don’t think of a lot of makeup. Then again, she’s often onstage so for all I know she is wearing a lot.”
However, the glamour look wasn’t all roses.
“If you wear a glam look, you should know you look very attractive” at quick glance, said Professor Etcoff, the author of “Survival of the Prettiest” (Doubleday, 1999), which argued that the pursuit of beauty is a biological as well as a cultural imperative. But over time, “there may be a lowering of trust, so if you are in a situation where you need to be a trusted source, perhaps you should choose a different look.”
Just as boardroom attire differs from what you would wear to a nightclub, so can makeup be chosen strategically depending on the agenda.
“There are times when you want to give a powerful ‘I’m in charge here’ kind of impression, and women shouldn’t be afraid to do that,” by, say, using a deeper lip color that could look shiny, increasing luminosity, said Sarah Vickery, another author of the study and a Procter & Gamble scientist. “Other times you want to give off a more balanced, more collaborative appeal.”
In that case, she suggested, opt for lip tones that are light to moderate in color saturation, providing contrast to facial skin, but not being too glossy.
But some women did not view the study’s findings as progress.
“I don’t wear makeup, nor do I wish to spend 20 minutes applying it,” said Deborah Rhode, a law professor at Stanford University who wrote “The Beauty Bias” (Oxford University Press, 2010), which details how appearance unjustly affects some workers. “The quality of my teaching shouldn’t depend on the color of my lipstick or whether I’ve got mascara on.”
She is no “beauty basher,” she said. “I’m against our preoccupation, and how judgments about attractiveness spill over into judgments about competence and job performance. We like individuals in the job market to be judged on the basis of competence, not cosmetics.”
But Professor Etcoff argued that there has been a cultural shift in ideas about self adornment, including makeup. “Twenty or 30 years ago, if you got dressed up, it was simply to please men, or it was something you were doing because society demands it,” she said. “Women and feminists today see this is their own choice, and it may be an effective tool.”
Dr. Vickery, whose Ph.D. is in chemistry, added that cosmetics “can significantly change how people see you, how smart people think you are on first impression, or how warm and approachable, and that look is completely within a woman’s control, when there are so many things you cannot control.”
Bobbi Brown, the founder of her namesake cosmetics line, suggested that focusing on others’ perceptions misses the point of what makes makeup powerful.
“We are able to transform ourselves, not only how we are perceived, but how we feel,” she said.
Ms. Brown also said that the wrong color on a subject may have caused some testers to conclude that women with high-contrasting makeup were more “untrustworthy.” “People will have a bad reaction if it’s not the right color, not the right texture, or if the makeup is not enhancing your natural beauty,” she said.
Daniel Hamermesh, an economics professor at the University of Texas at Austin, said the conclusion that makeup makes women look more likable — or more socially cooperative — made sense to him because “we conflate looks and a willingness to take care of yourself with a willingness to take care of people.”
Professor Hamermesh, the author of “Beauty Pays” (Princeton University Press, 2011), which lays out the leg-up the beautiful get, said he wished that good-looking people were not treated differently, but said he was a realist.
“Like any other thing that society rewards, people will take advantage of it,” he said of makeup’s benefits. “I’m an economist, so I say, why not? But I wish society didn’t reward this. I think we’d be a fairer world if beauty were not rewarded, but it is.”
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/13/fashion/makeup-makes-women-appear-more-competent-study.html?_r=2&src=tp









Feel Fierce for Fall in the...

lunes, 10 de octubre de 2011

New Sigma Synthetic Essential Kit







Synthetic Essential Kit
Our Price: $99.00








Our Price: $56.00
The Synthetic Kabuki Kit contains four face brushes for high definition, flawless makeup application. The brushes in this collection feature exclusive Synthetic filament, specially designed to apply powder and liquid products without absorption into the fibers. The shape, density and height of the filaments were carefully engineered to perfectly buff products onto the skin, resulting in a high definition effect.

F80 - Flat Kabuki
Ideal for all over application of liquid and cream formulas in large and mostly flat areas of the face, such as the forehead, temples and cheeks.  This brush is perfect to seamlessly buff foundation onto the skin.

F82 - Round Kabuki
Perfect to comfortably apply liquid and cream foundation on curved areas of the face, specifically around the eyes and nose, on the chin and the jaw line. This brush can also be used for all over application of mineral foundation.

F84 - Angled Kabuki
         The angled shape of this brush eases the application and blending of cream blushes onto the cheeks.   It           can also be used to apply and blend contour shades on the hair line, cheek bones and jaw line.

         F86 - Tapered Kabuki

         The tapered shape effortlessly applies products on defined and hard to reach areas of the face.
         This brush is perfect for all over application of powder, cream and liquid formulas.  It is also ideal for
         all over primer application, contouring and highlighting.




Our Price: $49.00 
 The Synthetic Precision Kit was developed to mimic your fingertips when applying makeup on your most sensitive and precise areas of your face. This line utilizes the exclusive Sigmax fibers for extreme softness and easy makeup application.

P80 - Precision Flat
The small, dense and flat top is ideal  to conceal blemishes, sun spots and small imperfections on the skin.  It can be used to stipple concealer on defined areas, followed by precise application of setting powder.

F82 - Precision Round
The rounded top was designed to mimic your fingertips, making this brush ideal to apply eye shadow primers.  It can also be used for the precise application of highlight shades on the bridge of the nose, cheek bones and cupid's bow.

P84 - Precision Angled
         The small angled top makes this brush perfect for precise contouring on the sides of the nose
         and contouring the hollows of the cheek bones. It can also be used to highlight the brow bone.

       P86 - Precision Tapered      The tapered shape of this brush is ideal for application of concealer under the eyes and on defined
      areas such as the sides of the nose, chin and around the mouth.  This brush can also be used to
      perfectly apply concealer around the lips to prevent color bleeding.




http://www.sigmabeauty.com/?Click=491

viernes, 7 de octubre de 2011

Opinion: Life as a Plus-Size Model in Thinness-Obsessed Venezuela By Jennifer-Barreto-Leyva Published October 03, 2011 | Fox News Latino




When I took my first step into the fashion scene 15 years ago, I never imagined I would turn so many heads and change so many minds not just in my country, Venezuela, but worldwide.
All the things you’ve heard about my country are true – Venezuelan women are vain, and they’ll do whatever it takes to achieve perfection.
As an oversize model, I don’t believe in that concept at all.
“She is promoting obesity and un-healthy habits,” they used to say about me.
I would try to understand the attacks and hatred toward me and my work. At the same time, thousands of people were thrilled that finally someone was brave enough to publicly say: “I have curves and I’m proud of it."









Read more: http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/lifestyle/2011/10/03/opinion-life-as-plus-size-model-in-thinness-obsessed-venezuela/#ixzz1a8SFwTta

martes, 4 de octubre de 2011

Plus-Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize MagazinePlus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements Here’s a little treat for you: newcomer plus-size model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine – let’s find out more about her: Height: 5’11” / 180 cm Measurements: 38C-30-42 / 96C-76-107 cm Dress Size: US 10-12 Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements See the rest of this shoot after the jump! Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine

Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements
Here’s a little treat for you: newcomer plus-size model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine – let’s find out more about her:
Height: 5’11” / 180 cm
Measurements: 38C-30-42 / 96C-76-107 cm
Dress Size: US 10-12
Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements
See the rest of this shoot after the jump!

Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements
Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements
Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements
Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements
Plus Size Model Bree Warren in Recognize Magazine | celebrity weight measurements

Epic sale, epic fail

Thoughtfully constructed to caress your curves in all the right places...